Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Do you have questions about your CPD logs? Please have a read of the key points and FAQs below as you may find your answer! If, after reading, you are still unsure about your situation or have any questions then please feel free to get in touch.

Key Points

  • As an APD, regardless of your employment status, you need to complete 30 hours of CPD each calendar year.
  • If you join the APD Program through the year (after the membership renewal period closes), you need to complete 2.5 hours of CPD per month that you are in the program for that calendar year.
  • You need to log your CPD learning goals (at least 2), learning activities and outcomes in ‘My CPD’ each year.
  • CPD Learning Goals, Logs and Learning Outcomes must be submitted for the period leading up to the date of commencement of intended deferment in order for deferment to be accepted. Each learning goal must have at least one activity allocated to it.
  • Not sure how to log a particular activity? Refer to the FAQ ‘How do I log my CPD activities?‘ below.
  • A minimum of 10 hours of activities must relate to your professional competence. Professional competence includes activities that develop expertise in your area of practice. Refer to the FAQ ‘what is professional competence?‘ below for more information.
  • To defer your APD status after 1 October in any year, you must have completed and documented at least 15 hours of CPD for that year.
  • If you don’t complete your CPD requirements prior to taking a break from the APD program (i.e. deferring, lapsing, resigning), that year will not count as an active APD year.
  • Do you have questions about CPD? Please contact the Credentialing Administrator via apd@daa.asn.au

Want to know more?

cpd-cycle

Having a plan for your CPD will help you to get the most out of your ongoing professional development. The plan may be developed on your own or with guidance from your mentor if you are a provisional APD. To develop your plan, work through the steps of the CPD cycle. Begin by reflecting on your practice and assessing your learning needs. From here, you can develop your learning goals. Follow this with planning CPD activities to meet those goals. After you complete your activities, you then need to sit and evaluate the outcomes.

At the beginning of each year, you need to develop your learning goals. These goals are what you want to learn throughout the year.

Your goals may change over the year if your circumstances change, and should be updated in your CPD log in ‘My CPD’. Goals may also be in place for more than 1 year.

When developing learning goals, it is important that:

  • Learning goals are clearly expressed
  • They are goals, not activities
  • Goals are relevant to your nutrition practice
  • There are a minimum of 2 goals

Here are some examples of learning goals:

  • To maintain and enhance current knowledge in general nutrition issues
  • To demonstrate new skills and best practice in the nutrition assessment and management of people with type 2 diabetes
  • To extend mentoring/supervisory/leadership skills and knowledge
  • To establish skills in scientific writing for journal publication
  • To enhance competency in research skills
  • To increase competency in undertaking clinical trials
  • To develop skills in writing for the public
  • To increase competency with writing grant proposals.

Each of your goals need to align to at least 1 practice development area and not all practice development areas need to be covered each year. These areas are linked directly to the Advanced APD framework and provide the opportunity for you to plan your development of knowledge and skills over time, to become an advanced practitioner.

From 2019, the practice development areas will change to align with the latest Advanced APD competency standards that were updated and released in 2017. These practice development areas are:

  • Advances the profession
  • Engages in personal and professional development
  • Effectively implements change
  • Evaluates and disseminates research and QI outcomes
  • Engages in learning and teaching, training/supervision
  • Recognised as an expert resource and advocate
  • Manages complex problems to enhance outcomes

Selecting practice development areas allows you to identify gaps within your practice and develop a CPD plan to address these. This allows you to start planning your journey to becoming an Advanced APD!

Undertaking CPD activities translates your goals into actions. You should engage in a wide variety of CPD activities that relate directly to your learning goals. You are required to complete a minimum of 30 hours of CPD activities each calendar year. A minimum of 10 hours of activities must relate to your professional competence. For example, you may complete a course in anthropometry measurement if you are working in a weight loss clinic.

From 2019, there is a tick box when you log each activity allowing you to identify the activity that is relative to maintaining your professional competency in your current area of practice. Professional competence includes activities that develop expertise in dietetic practice which include excellence in practice.

The APD Program has a variety of modules, which outline a range of possible CPD activity types that can be recorded for the APD Program. These modules cover most activities an APD would undertake to fulfill their CPD plan. Each CPD activity must be allocated to a module that best describes the activity. You are not required to complete activities in each module every year, however you are encouraged to undertake a broad range of learning experiences and approaches over time. You can claim as many hours of CPD as you desire in all but 1 module. Where in previous years both professional education non-assessed and self-study were each capped at 20 hours per year, from 2019, only self-study will remain capped at 20 hours per year. There are now no restrictions to the number of hours of any other module.

It is crucial that CPD activities are documented correctly. Activities must:

  • Be appropriate to broad interpretation of nutrition and dietetic practice and be relevant to evidence-based practice
  • Be about learning, and not something expected in the normal course of work
  • Contain enough detail
  • Be allocated to the correct module and learning goal

Generally, activities or publications oriented to consumers do not fulfill criteria as suitable for contributing to CPD for the APD Program purposes.

If you undertake a course or activity across more than one day, you will need to log multiple entries for the activity, as each CPD activity needs to be logged for the date that it was completed.

What to include in your CPD log from 2019 onward:

The way you document your CPD activities will change from 2019. These changes are designed to make the logging process simpler for you whilst ensuring all required information is included in your logs.

From 2019, the need to distinguish between ‘professional education-assessed‘ and ‘professional education- non-assessed‘ has been removed. All professional education activities can be logged under the same module and there is no cap on the number of hours you can complete. The ‘evidence based activity’ and ‘quality improvement activity’ modules have been combined into ‘quality improvement/research’ due to the similarities between the two.

The name of the ‘mentee mentor activity‘ module has now changed to ‘mentoring/supervision activity‘ due to the benefits of both types of relationships. When logging activities under this module, there is an additional drop down option called ‘type of activity‘ to distinguish the specific nature of these CPD activities. For example, when logging mentor meetings for the provisional APD program you should select ‘provisional APD mentoring meeting‘ under ‘type of activity‘.

The specific details of what is required for each module is outlined in the table below. In addition to these details, there is also an option to add additional information in the ‘description’ box. If you wish to make any comments or reflections about the activity, for your own record, there is now a ‘comments’ text box. The ‘comments’ box is an opportunity to add any additional information about the activity beyond the required details.

Module Description Examples of CPD Activities Log must include
Professional Education This module covers attendance or completion of a range of professional educational activities where there is an exchange and sharing of information. These activities may or may not contain an assessment item. • Conference attendance
• Workshop or seminar attendance
• Workplace education
• Online presentations and webinars
• Evidence based podcast
• A university unit
• Online education package
The event organiser, the event name (or topic if no specific name) and who presented.
Self-Study (20 hours per year cap) The focus of self-study activities is to update knowledge and enhance practice and this supports other types of CPD. You should ensure that self-study materials are of a peer review or professional standard and correctly referenced in the CPD log.

Publications oriented to consumers or product information does not fulfil criteria as suitable for contributing to CPD for the APD Program purposes.

• Peer reviewed journals
• Professional newsletters
• Textbooks
• PEN content
• Completing your AdvAPD application
Name of the journal/ publication/ website, title, year of publication. If the publication year is unknown, or the item is not published, please indicate this.
Quality improvement/ Research These are activities that:

· contribute to nutrition/ dietetic research and the development of the evidence base in dietetics, or;

· involve active participation in the design, implementation and/or evaluation of the QI activity (QI cycle).

 • Preparation of a conference paper, presentation or poster
• Writing or submitting an article for a peer reviewed journal
• Development of evidence-based guidelines
• Writing or reviewing for PEN
• Quality improvement or quality management activities
A brief description of the activity including how the research contributes to the evidence base, and/or  which  stage of the QI cycle the activity reflects.
Mentoring/ Supervision activity Mentoring and supervision are effective CPD activities for both parties. Include mentoring or supervision as a CPD activity where you are actively learning from this partnership.

Mentees in a provisional APD program must log their meetings under this module, selecting the ‘provisional APD mentoring meeting’ option from the ‘activity type’ drop-down menu.

 • Mentoring for Provisional APD Program (provisional)
• Workplace mentoring partnerships
• Peer review sessions
•  Supervision partnership
Type of activity (i.e. provisional APD mentoring meeting, supervision, peer learning) and a brief description of topic of discussion
DAA Strategic Activity These activities include participation in a DAA activity • being chair or member of a DAA committee
• DAA IG convener
• DAA Board member
• DAA Branch
• Committee Member
• DAA Representative
• Contributing to a DAA submission.
Specifics of the DAA activity

At the end of each CPD year, you need to reflect on your activities and write a learning outcome for each of your goals. Reflection is an important part of the CPD cycle. You will need to determine whether a change to practice has occurred based on your learning and also how the activities you undertook helped you reach this outcome. You may not achieve your goal at the end of the year and this is fine. This is an opportunity to reflect on why this is the case.

When reflecting on and evaluating your goals at the end of the CPD year, ensure that:

  • The outcomes are clearly related to the goals and clearly expressed
  • They are expressed as outcomes, not activities
  • The outcomes demonstrate reflective practice

When writing your learning outcomes, you may find it useful to ask yourself the following questions:

  • Has your practice changed as a result of your learning? Why or why not? How has it changed?
  • How have the CPD activities influenced your practice?
  • What impact have these activities had on you and/or your practice?

Below are examples of learning outcomes that relate directly to the example learning goals above.

  • I have maintained my knowledge of general nutrition issues so that I am aware of the environment in which I work and I feel that I am more able to deliver services and advocate for nutrition and dietetics.
  • I have extended my skills in the nutrition assessment and management of people with type 2 diabetes, and increasingly I have been able to advise patients using new technologies in self-management.
  • I have extended my mentoring skills through self-reflection, and discussion with colleagues, and have now taken on the role of mentor for new staff in our agency.
  • I have established my skills in scientific writing by preparing and submitting papers, and learning from reviewer’s feedback, such that I have now become a reviewer on our local small grant committee.
  • My self-education, and attendance at conferences and professional activities has increased my knowledge of what is new in the research and knowledge base and I have incorporated this into my lectures and research.
  • My competence in undertaking clinical trials has increased by reflection on my activities within a trial, and I am now more confident in making suggestions for methodology to my project leader
  • I have developed my skills in workshops and through reading so that I am more effective and efficient when writing for the popular press. This has resulted in good feedback from magazine editors.
  • My competency has increased as I have built on my experience in writing grant proposals with feedback from colleagues during the submission process. Now I am more confident preparing a rebuttal to the funding agency’s reviews.

As a member of the National Alliance of Self Regulating Health Professionals (NASRHP), it is a mandatory requirement to include skills and knowledge relative to your professional practice as a CPD activity type. To implement this requirement, we have added a tick box to each activity entry to allow you to identify which activities relate to your professional competence.

In 2018 and previous years, the system was built to require at least one of your learning goals to be aligned with the ‘professional competence’ practice development area. However, from 2019 we have incorporated the tick box so you can select any activity that relates to your professional competence regardless of which goal it is under, as we understand that you may complete activities under more than one goal that are still relevant to this area.

For the purpose of your CPD, professional competence includes activities that develop your skills, knowledge and expertise related to your area of practice.

For example, you may complete a course in anthropometry measurement if you are working in a weight loss clinic, or you could complete a leadership course if you are involved in staff management, or a professional writing course if you work in policy.

If you were to undertake CPD related to a particular area of interest, but this isn’t relevant to your practice, this would not be considered professional competence but you can still log this as CPD.

It is at your discretion to determine which activities relate to your individual professional competence.

 

Learning Goals
Incorrect Why it’s incorrect Correct
 1. Maintain current nutrition knowledge This goal does not specify what learning will occur.  1. To maintain and enhance current knowledge in general nutrition issues.
 2. Clarify the nutritional assessment and management of patients with food allergies and intolerances. These goals are all expressed as activities. Goals should state what you want to learn.  2. To improve understanding and knowledge in the nutrition assessment and management of people with food allergies and intolerances.
 3. To submit a journal article  3. To establish skills in scientific writing for journal publication.
 4. To implement a Quality Improvement activity at work  4. To enhance skills in the development and implementation of Quality Improvement activities.

 

 

CPD logs (based on the above learning goals)—Incorrect 
Activity Module Hours Learning goal Why it’s incorrect
Mentor meeting. Mentee/ Mentor activity 1 1 Not enough detail recorded about the activity. Log should include details of topics discussed.
Researched enteral nutrition guidelines. Self-study 1 1 Not enough detail recorded about the activity. Log should include the title, journal name and year of publication.
Attended Food intolerance investigation workshop at conference. Professional education-assessed 2 2 Not enough detail recorded about the activity. Who presented the workshop? Which conference was the workshop a part of? What was the assessment item?
Planned how to implement protected mealtimes. Quality Improvement activity 3 4 This appears to be directly related to work requirements and does not demonstrate learning.
Drafted systematic review for submission to Nutrition & Dietetics and met with a colleague who is experienced in writing for this journal, to edit and prepare my paper ‘xx’ for submission. Quality Improvement activity 5 4 The module and learning goals are incorrectly allocated. The correct module would be Evidence-based activity and the correct goal will be goal 3.
Attendance at a networking event for dietitians in Canberra. Professional education-non-assessed 3 1 This activity is not deemed relevant to evidence based nutrition practice.

 

CPD logs (based on the above learning goals)—Correct 
Activity Module Hours Learning goal Why it’s correct
Mentor meeting-discussed case study for enteral nutrition and selection criteria for job application. Mentee/ Mentor activity 1 1 Logs for this module should include a brief description of the topic(s) of discussion.
Read the January 2015 ‘Enteral nutrition manual for adults in health care facilities’ by Suzie Ferrie and DAA Nutrition Support Interest Group, available on DINER. Self-study 1 1 Self-study should be of a peer review or professional standard, and correctly referenced including the journal or database name.
Attended ‘Food intolerance investigation-a practical approach’ workshop at 2016 DAA National Conference, presented by Anne Swaine et al., completed MCQs. Professional education-assessed 2 2 Logs for this module must include the topic, who presented, who were the organisers and what the assessment process was.
Conducted a literature review on ProQuest to determine the best methods to implement and evaluate a new protected mealtime Initiative-Planning stage of QI cycle. Quality improvement activity 3 4 Logs for this module must include what part of the quality cycle the activity reflects (i.e. ‘plan’).
Drafted systematic review for submission to Nutrition & Dietetics and met with a colleague who is experienced in writing for this journal, to edit and prepare my paper ‘xx’ for submission. Evidence-based practice 5 3 Is now allocated to the correct module and learning goal. Activities for this module should highlight how it will contribute to evidence.

 

Learning Outcomes (based on the above learning goals)
Incorrect Why it’s incorrect Correct
I have maintained my knowledge in general nutrition issues. This does not demonstrate reflective practice. I have maintained my knowledge of general nutrition issues so that I am aware of the environment in which I work and I feel that I am more able to deliver services and advocate for nutrition and dietetics.
I assessed three children with food allergies and identified trigger foods. I also provided appropriate dietary advice. This outcome is expressed as an activity rather than a change to practice or as an outcome that shows the results of your learning activities. My competence in conducting a comprehensive nutrition assessment in children with food allergies has improved. I am now more confident at identifying potential trigger foods, and providing appropriate dietary advice.
I established my skills and submitted a journal article to Nutrition & Dietetics. This is does not demonstrate reflective practice. I have established my skills in scientific writing by preparing and submitting a paper to Nutrition & Dietetics, and learning from the feedback of colleagues and reviewers, such that I have now become a reviewer on our local small grant committee.
I developed a plan to implement protected mealtimes. This outcome is expressed as an activity rather than a change to practice or as an outcome that shows the results of your learning activities. As a result of implementing a protected mealtimes initiative at xx hospital, I feel that I can now instigate QI activities with more confidence, and subsequently require less input from supervisors.

The Formal Stuff